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5 Worth-It Tools for Advanced HR Management

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Remember when the human resource function within most companies was largely administrative? Josh Bersin paints the picture perfectly when he describes traditional HR as being “focused on service delivery, staying efficient and reducing cost and headcount.”[i] But, times are changing. HR’s realm of responsibility – and the impact it has on the business at large – continues to grow. Advanced practitioners need robust technology that can keep up with their ever-growing list of expectations.

The ideal HCM solution contains five applications: talent acquisition, time and labor management, payroll, talent management, and HR management. Each has its own functions, which when combined into one application, represents the total package.

  1. Talent acquisition

According to the National Business Research Institute, one poor hiring decision could cost your company between $25,000 and $300,000, depending on your industry. A single-platform HCM solution with talent acquisition functions makes it easier to hire the right people while simplifying other recruiting and hiring processes. Tools include:

  • candidate tracker, which allows you to monitor those candidates with potential but have not yet applied for a position
  • applicant tracker, which shortens the process of moving applicants through to onboarding
  • tax credits, which secures available tax credits
  • background checks, which verify whether applicants are qualified

 

The ideal system also has onboarding and E-Verify® tools – plus talent acquisition analytics – to help you streamline your hiring processes, comply with government regulations and gain insight into recruiting productivity.

  1. Time and labor management

The Fair Labor Standards Act does not mandate that employers use a specific timekeeping system to record hours worked, but it does require that employers use a system that is accurate and complete. Therefore, a time and labor management suite is an important addition to any HCM solution.

System capabilities should include:

  • flexible timekeeping, such as web-based time clock, hardware terminal or online time sheets
  • functionality that combats time theft by eliminating “buddy punching”
  • a convenient platform for employees to manage PTO requests
  • integrates time and labor with payroll processes to control labor costs and eliminate errors caused by double entry

 

  1. Payroll

Payroll is perhaps the most critical of all five processes to your employees because it directly concerns their paychecks. Payroll is a broad and far-reaching process with serious compliance implications with regards to wages, benefits and taxes. A single-database HCM solution that simplifies payroll processes and keeps you in compliance is vital to keeping employees – and the government – happy. Some essential tools are:

  • online payroll processing
  • payroll tax management
  • wage garnishment management
  • expense management
  • payroll analytics
  • check reconciliation
  • mapped general ledger reports for import into your accounting software

 

  1. Talent management

Organizations need the best talent in order to thrive in today’s ultra-competitive and increasingly complex global economy. Managing talent is critical to achieving a competitive edge, but it’s also a challenging undertaking that involves several key elements, including developing, engaging and rewarding talent to enhance performance and boost retention.

Equipped with talent management tools – including performance management, employee self-service and compensation budgeting – a five-tiered all-in-one HCM solution plays a powerful role in growing talent and your business.

  1. HR management

The most comprehensive of the five applications, human resource management is the function that deals with your organization’s most valued asset: the people working there. All activities impacting people fall under HR management, including hiring, compensation, performance management, safety, wellness, organizational development, benefits, administration, training, communication and employee motivation. A well-rounded solution will have the tools you need to optimize those processes, including:

  • employee and manager self-service
  • surveys for soliciting feedback
  • enhanced ACA
  • COBRA administration

Some HCM solutions take a fractured approach, partially catering to organizational needs. The ideal solution, however, takes a united approach, satisfying all the key elements of human capital management.

[i] Bersin, Josh, “Why Does HR Get So Much Grief?”, Forbes, forbes.com, August 2014.


Amy Double

by Amy Double


Author Bio: Amy, a tenured professional in sales and marketing with over 10 years of experience, is dedicated to creating content focused on helping organizations achieve their business goals. As an experienced writer, Amy is committed to researching and blogging about topics that affect businesses across multiple industries, including manufacturing, hospitality and more. Outside of work, Amy enjoys reading, entertaining and spending time with family.

Open positions

Why Its So Difficult to Fill Your Open Positions

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If you feel like it’s getting more and more challenging to find qualified employees to fill your positions, you’re right. New evidence from the Deutsche Bank indicates that the length of time a vacancy lays open has increased overall since 2010. Open positions are increasingly difficult to fill due to several trends within the current labor market. However, there are several actions you can take as a business leader to improve your ability to hire and retain a quality workforce.

Finding and keeping the top-talent your business needs is about to get tougher.

Open Positions Are Staying Vacant Longer

Currently, according to economist Torsten Sløk with the Deutsche Bank, positions are open on average 31 days before being filled. That’s significantly higher than the 24-day average in prerecession 2007, which was the longest span positions stayed vacant since 2001. Job vacancies were filled in about 15 days in 2009, and the length of time it has taken to fill open positions has increased steadily in the eight years since.

Many Business Struggle to Find and Keep Qualified Workers

What does this mean for business leaders? That finding the right worker has become increasingly challenging. The Federal Reserve’s recently released Beige Book notes tightening in labor markets nationwide.

In Pennsylvania, for example, “staffing contacts reported spending more time and money on recruiting labor and refilling positions after the initial hire quit, sometimes after just a few days.”

Additionally, the Federal Reserve’s contacts across the nation and in a variety of industries reported that hiring was limited because there were not enough qualified workers available.

Labor Trends Influencing This Challenge

Some of the reasons cited by the Beige Book included job hopping and a disconnect between companies and job candidates on compensation. Federal Reserve contacts noted “rising wage pressures” in both high- and low-skilled positions. Some also mentioned that the costs of benefits and variable pay were increasing.

Another possible reason employers struggle to find the right people to fill their positions is a growing gap between the skills needed in the workplace and the skills that are available among the workforce. In fact, according to SHRM, we are currently facing “the most acute talent shortage since the Great Recession.”

What It Means For You

It’s now more important than ever to retain your star employees, and attract candidates like them. Having competitive compensation and a culture that appeals to the job seeker can give you an edge in this job market. Consider implementing more in-depth, on-the-job training to address the skills gap, and ensure that you have efficient hiring processes in place to eliminate any wasted time, money and energy.

If you’d like to learn more about current labor trends and what they mean for your business, you can find a wealth of information in our on-demand webinar on current labor trends.

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Posted in Blog, Featured, Talent Acquisition

Jeff York

by Jeff York


Author Bio: Jeff York, Paycom’s chief sales officer, has more than three decades of sales experience and has held a variety of sales management positions; prior to joining Paycom In 2007, York spent 12 years with a legacy payroll provider, where he held a variety of sales management positions including vice president of sales for the major accounts division. York, a Texas Tech University graduate, also holds an MBA from Baylor University’s Hankamer School of Business.

IRS Continues to Enforce Affordable Care Act

IRS Continues to Enforce Affordable Care Act

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The IRS recently released an information letter indicating that the IRS continues to enforce the Affordable Care Act (ACA).

Dated June 30, Letter 2017-0010 was sent to a member of Congress who reached out to the IRS at the request of a constituent, a tax-exempt entity concerned it may owe an employer shared responsibility payment (ESRP) because it did not comply with the ACA rules on offering health insurance to its employees, for both financial and religious reasons.

The letter first provides a brief summary of the circumstances that might lead to a large employer owing an ESRP, and notes that there is no provision in the ACA that provides for the waiver of an ESRP.

The letter then addresses the effect of the president’s Jan. 20 executive order on the enforcement of the ACA. Titled “Minimizing the Economic Burden of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act Pending Repeal,” the order directed federal agencies to exercise discretion permitted to them by law to reduce potential burdens imposed by the ACA.

However, it did not change the health care law. The legislative provisions of the ACA are still in force until changed by Congress; therefore, taxpayers remain required to follow the law and pay what they may owe.

For more information on the executive order and the current tax filing season, visit https://www.irs.gov/tax-professionals/aca-information-center-for-tax-professionals.

What This Means for Employers

Since Congress has not yet passed a bill that would repeal the ACA, and Republicans have struggled to draft a bill that would receive majority support, employers should use caution and plan to comply with the law’s requirements unless and until the ACA is repealed and any new law’s provisions actually go into effect. Continued compliance may be required for a transition period, following passage of an ACA repeal bill, depending on the language of that legislation.

 

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Posted in ACA, Blog, Featured

Erin Maxwell

by Erin Maxwell


Author Bio: As a compliance attorney for Paycom, Erin Maxwell monitors legal and regulatory changes at the state and federal level, focusing on health and employee benefits laws, to ensure the Paycom system is updated accordingly. She previously served as assistant general counsel at Asset Servicing Group in Oklahoma City. She holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of Central Oklahoma and a J.D. from the University of Oklahoma. Outside of work, Maxwell enjoys politics, historical mysteries and spending time with her family.

Missouri minimum wage

Missouri Minimum Wage to Decrease from $10 to $7.70

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An overwhelming trend in the U.S. is cities and states increasing the minimum wage employers must pay their employees. However, St. Louis, Missouri is bucking this trend – although not willingly – by decreasing its minimum wage from $10 to $7.70, effective Aug. 28.

Court Battle

In 2015, St. Louis passed an ordinance raising its minimum wage to $10, with an automatic increase to $11 scheduled for January 2018. This prompted the Missouri legislature to pass legislation to pre-empt the ordinance from taking effect. The legislation was quickly enjoined in a lawsuit that went all the way to the Missouri Supreme Court.

In May of this year, St. Louis prevailed in the lawsuit and the minimum wage increased to $10. However, three months after the $10 minimum wage was implemented, the Missouri legislature passed another law disallowing any city in the state from having a higher minimum wage than the state, which is currently $7.70, this forcing St. Louis to reverse.

States vs. Cities

State governments dictating cities’ minimum wages is not altogether uncommon. In 2016, Alabama’s legislature shut down the Birmingham City Council’s efforts to raise its minimum wage. Similar efforts were undertaken by Ohio to block the City of Cleveland.

Other states have preemptively prohibited localities from passing minimum-wage ordinances – even before cities have commenced such efforts. Some of these states include:

  • Colorado
  • Idaho
  • Indiana
  • Kansas
  • Kentucky
  • Michigan
  • North Carolina
  • Oklahoma
  • South Carolina
  • Tennessee
  • Texas
  • Wisconsin

 

Although the St. Louis minimum wage decrease runs counter to the national trend, state legislatures prohibiting local increases is not uncommon. As more cities begin to adopt higher minimum wages, expect some state legislatures to push back.

Disclaimer: This blog includes general information about legal issues and developments in the law. Such materials are for informational purposes only and may not reflect the most current legal developments. These informational materials are not intended, and must not be taken, as legal advice on any particular set of facts or circumstances. You need to contact a lawyer licensed in your jurisdiction for advice on specific legal problems.

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Posted in Blog, Featured, Payroll

Jason Hines

by Jason Hines


Author Bio: Jason Hines is a Paycom compliance attorney. With more than five years’ experience in the legal field, he monitors developments in human resource laws, rules and regulations to ensure any changes are promptly updated in Paycom’s system for our clients. Previously, he was an attorney at the Oklahoma City law firm Elias, Books, Brown & Nelson. Hines earned a bachelor’s degree from the University of Central Oklahoma and his juris doctor degree from the Oklahoma City University School of Law, where he graduated cum laude. A fan of the Oklahoma City Thunder, Hines also enjoys exploring the great outdoors with his wife and daughter.

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