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Mobile Learning Technology

LMS 101: Mobile Learning Technology

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Learning Management Systems 101 is a weekly blog series exploring how employers can rethink traditional employee training and move toward e-learning solutions, which are faster, easier to access, and more cost effective. “Mobile Learning Technology” is the fifth post of the series.

LMS 101: Mobile Learning Technology

Mobile learning, (m-Learning) offers a new education channel in which learners can access content on demand, regardless of time or location – all they need is a mobile device and internet connection. A subset of eLearning, m-learning is rapidly evolving in many regions and sectors of the world, including the U.S. corporate sector.

How Fast is M-Learning Growth?

By 2020, the mobile workforce will represent almost 75 percent of the U.S. workforce, according to the International Data Corporation. Also, Chief Learning Officer magazine reports that mobile learning has become the leading workforce trend to look out for in 2017. According to elearningindustry.com, approximately 47 percent of businesses now use mobile devices to deliver online training – and that number is sure to rise.

Why Is Mobile Learning So in Demand?

Studies show that the main appeal of m-learning is its access. Employees can obtain training or take courses from their smartphone or tablet whenever and wherever it suits them. They can learn at home, while commuting or in their spare time. This scenario wasn’t possible many years ago, when employees had to learn in physical locations at their employer’s discretion. Now, learning can occur anywhere.

Another reason for m-learning’s popularity is cost. Since mobile learning is applicable only to distance learning and not face-to-face classroom learning, employers do not incur costs associated with physical learning – such as consultants, venue and paper document costs. There is also no hardware cost or connectivity charges. Since many employees already have mobile phones or tablets, employers typically don’t have to purchase these devices.

A third reason is ease of use. Mobile learning – which is delivered through a learning management system (LMS) – is easy to administer. Customizable courses can be presented in bite-sized lessons, in the form of videos, podcasts, PowerPoint slides, surveys, quizzes, spreadsheets and more. Simply record the information on your mobile phone, upload it to the LMS, then assign the training or course to relevant employees.

Mobile learning is also a boon to productivity. Employees don’t have to be pulled away from work to participate in training – which is especially helpful to employers with multiple locations.

Case in point:

A growing electric motor company with 380 employees saved a substantial amount of time and money, strengthened client relationships, reached its goal of consistent training, and is on track to be ISO-certified because they implemented mobile learning through the LMS tool, Paycom Learning. The organization’s new hire productivity rate has jumped 80 percent, mainly due to new employees being able to take courses at their convenience during onboarding. This on-demand functionality has also benefitted approximately 50 field employees working on wind turbines – who were able to access training on their mobile device. The company, which has reported saving $270,000 annually through Paycom Learning, was able to:

  • Salvage four client relationships via nonconformity training
  • Deliver consistent training to nine locations
  • Remotely train 50 field employees
  • Provide on-demand training to 380 employees

 

Why Should Employers Consider Mobile Learning?

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates that millennials will account for 75 percent of the U.S. workforce by 2030. Further, according to a survey by PwC, 41 percent of millennials said they prefer electronic communication at work over face-to-face and telephone communication. The study also ranks excellent training/development programs among the top three things that millennials believe contributes to an employer’s attractiveness.

While the decision to adopt mobile learning should not be based solely on the preferences of millennials, this generation deserves much consideration because technology dominates virtually every aspect of their lives.

To learn more about the evolution of corporate learning, how to refine your approach to employee training, why technology is crucial to onboarding and how an LMS can boost your company’s employee’s engagement, be sure to check out the first four posts of the LMS 101 series.

 For more information about how to propel your business growth through employee learning, download this free white paper: Learning Management Systems: Fueling Employee Knowledge and Propelling Business Growth. Or, to learn more about how Paycom’s HR technology can help your business grow, contact us today.


Holly Faurot

by Holly Faurot


Author Bio: Faurot, vice president of client relations, has served in a number of roles during her tenure at Paycom, including regional vice president, sales training manager and sales consultant. A born leader and a 2012 honoree in Oklahoma’s 30 Under 30 awards, she has helped a number of individuals and clients achieve success through her energetic spirit. The product of a dairy farm in Kenefic, Okla., Faurot was taught at a young age the importance of working hard, being honest and having a desire to help others.

Open positions

Why Its So Difficult to Fill Your Open Positions

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If you feel like it’s getting more and more challenging to find qualified employees to fill your positions, you’re right. New evidence from the Deutsche Bank indicates that the length of time a vacancy lays open has increased overall since 2010. Open positions are increasingly difficult to fill due to several trends within the current labor market. However, there are several actions you can take as a business leader to improve your ability to hire and retain a quality workforce.

Finding and keeping the top-talent your business needs is about to get tougher.

Open Positions Are Staying Vacant Longer

Currently, according to economist Torsten Sløk with the Deutsche Bank, positions are open on average 31 days before being filled. That’s significantly higher than the 24-day average in prerecession 2007, which was the longest span positions stayed vacant since 2001. Job vacancies were filled in about 15 days in 2009, and the length of time it has taken to fill open positions has increased steadily in the eight years since.

Many Business Struggle to Find and Keep Qualified Workers

What does this mean for business leaders? That finding the right worker has become increasingly challenging. The Federal Reserve’s recently released Beige Book notes tightening in labor markets nationwide.

In Pennsylvania, for example, “staffing contacts reported spending more time and money on recruiting labor and refilling positions after the initial hire quit, sometimes after just a few days.”

Additionally, the Federal Reserve’s contacts across the nation and in a variety of industries reported that hiring was limited because there were not enough qualified workers available.

Labor Trends Influencing This Challenge

Some of the reasons cited by the Beige Book included job hopping and a disconnect between companies and job candidates on compensation. Federal Reserve contacts noted “rising wage pressures” in both high- and low-skilled positions. Some also mentioned that the costs of benefits and variable pay were increasing.

Another possible reason employers struggle to find the right people to fill their positions is a growing gap between the skills needed in the workplace and the skills that are available among the workforce. In fact, according to SHRM, we are currently facing “the most acute talent shortage since the Great Recession.”

What It Means For You

It’s now more important than ever to retain your star employees, and attract candidates like them. Having competitive compensation and a culture that appeals to the job seeker can give you an edge in this job market. Consider implementing more in-depth, on-the-job training to address the skills gap, and ensure that you have efficient hiring processes in place to eliminate any wasted time, money and energy.

If you’d like to learn more about current labor trends and what they mean for your business, you can find a wealth of information in our on-demand webinar on current labor trends.

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Posted in Blog, Featured, Talent Acquisition

Jeff York

by Jeff York


Author Bio: Jeff York, Paycom’s chief sales officer, has more than three decades of sales experience and has held a variety of sales management positions; prior to joining Paycom In 2007, York spent 12 years with a legacy payroll provider, where he held a variety of sales management positions including vice president of sales for the major accounts division. York, a Texas Tech University graduate, also holds an MBA from Baylor University’s Hankamer School of Business.

IRS Continues to Enforce Affordable Care Act

IRS Continues to Enforce Affordable Care Act

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The IRS recently released an information letter indicating that the IRS continues to enforce the Affordable Care Act (ACA).

Dated June 30, Letter 2017-0010 was sent to a member of Congress who reached out to the IRS at the request of a constituent, a tax-exempt entity concerned it may owe an employer shared responsibility payment (ESRP) because it did not comply with the ACA rules on offering health insurance to its employees, for both financial and religious reasons.

The letter first provides a brief summary of the circumstances that might lead to a large employer owing an ESRP, and notes that there is no provision in the ACA that provides for the waiver of an ESRP.

The letter then addresses the effect of the president’s Jan. 20 executive order on the enforcement of the ACA. Titled “Minimizing the Economic Burden of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act Pending Repeal,” the order directed federal agencies to exercise discretion permitted to them by law to reduce potential burdens imposed by the ACA.

However, it did not change the health care law. The legislative provisions of the ACA are still in force until changed by Congress; therefore, taxpayers remain required to follow the law and pay what they may owe.

For more information on the executive order and the current tax filing season, visit https://www.irs.gov/tax-professionals/aca-information-center-for-tax-professionals.

What This Means for Employers

Since Congress has not yet passed a bill that would repeal the ACA, and Republicans have struggled to draft a bill that would receive majority support, employers should use caution and plan to comply with the law’s requirements unless and until the ACA is repealed and any new law’s provisions actually go into effect. Continued compliance may be required for a transition period, following passage of an ACA repeal bill, depending on the language of that legislation.

 

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Posted in ACA, Blog, Featured

Erin Maxwell

by Erin Maxwell


Author Bio: As a compliance attorney for Paycom, Erin Maxwell monitors legal and regulatory changes at the state and federal level, focusing on health and employee benefits laws, to ensure the Paycom system is updated accordingly. She previously served as assistant general counsel at Asset Servicing Group in Oklahoma City. She holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of Central Oklahoma and a J.D. from the University of Oklahoma. Outside of work, Maxwell enjoys politics, historical mysteries and spending time with her family.

Missouri minimum wage

Missouri Minimum Wage to Decrease from $10 to $7.70

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An overwhelming trend in the U.S. is cities and states increasing the minimum wage employers must pay their employees. However, St. Louis, Missouri is bucking this trend – although not willingly – by decreasing its minimum wage from $10 to $7.70, effective Aug. 28.

Court Battle

In 2015, St. Louis passed an ordinance raising its minimum wage to $10, with an automatic increase to $11 scheduled for January 2018. This prompted the Missouri legislature to pass legislation to pre-empt the ordinance from taking effect. The legislation was quickly enjoined in a lawsuit that went all the way to the Missouri Supreme Court.

In May of this year, St. Louis prevailed in the lawsuit and the minimum wage increased to $10. However, three months after the $10 minimum wage was implemented, the Missouri legislature passed another law disallowing any city in the state from having a higher minimum wage than the state, which is currently $7.70, this forcing St. Louis to reverse.

States vs. Cities

State governments dictating cities’ minimum wages is not altogether uncommon. In 2016, Alabama’s legislature shut down the Birmingham City Council’s efforts to raise its minimum wage. Similar efforts were undertaken by Ohio to block the City of Cleveland.

Other states have preemptively prohibited localities from passing minimum-wage ordinances – even before cities have commenced such efforts. Some of these states include:

  • Colorado
  • Idaho
  • Indiana
  • Kansas
  • Kentucky
  • Michigan
  • North Carolina
  • Oklahoma
  • South Carolina
  • Tennessee
  • Texas
  • Wisconsin

 

Although the St. Louis minimum wage decrease runs counter to the national trend, state legislatures prohibiting local increases is not uncommon. As more cities begin to adopt higher minimum wages, expect some state legislatures to push back.

Disclaimer: This blog includes general information about legal issues and developments in the law. Such materials are for informational purposes only and may not reflect the most current legal developments. These informational materials are not intended, and must not be taken, as legal advice on any particular set of facts or circumstances. You need to contact a lawyer licensed in your jurisdiction for advice on specific legal problems.

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Posted in Blog, Featured, Payroll

Jason Hines

by Jason Hines


Author Bio: Jason Hines is a Paycom compliance attorney. With more than five years’ experience in the legal field, he monitors developments in human resource laws, rules and regulations to ensure any changes are promptly updated in Paycom’s system for our clients. Previously, he was an attorney at the Oklahoma City law firm Elias, Books, Brown & Nelson. Hines earned a bachelor’s degree from the University of Central Oklahoma and his juris doctor degree from the Oklahoma City University School of Law, where he graduated cum laude. A fan of the Oklahoma City Thunder, Hines also enjoys exploring the great outdoors with his wife and daughter.

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