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Employee Motivation

Employee Engagement vs. Employee Motivation

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Are Employee Engagement and Employee Motivation the Same Thing?

Frank Sinatra said it best in his classic Love and Marriage, “you can’t have one without the other.” Both are crucial to driving your employees to do big things for your business. Before we dive in, it’s important to explore the idea of motivation itself.

Intrinsic Motivation vs. Extrinsic Motivation

In general, motivation describes the force that compels people to act, or decide to take a specific course of action. However, according to a University of Rochester study published in American Psychologist, not all motivation is the same. For example, when employees are intrinsically motivated, they’re passionate about their work because they either really enjoy doing it, or they enjoy the pride and satisfaction that comes from a job well done.

Do you know what your employees really want?

On the other hand, when employees are extrinsically motivated, they’re spurred to action by external forces, which can be either positive or negative in nature. These employees typically act in order to gain certain rewards (like time off or a bonus) or to avoid unpleasant circumstances (like an angry boss or being terminated).

You probably can see where this is going.

The Relationship Between Motivation and Engagement

Typically, engaged employees are intrinsically motivated. They love what they do, strive to master new skills and are enthusiastic about applying their talents. And there’s a lot to be said for how an engaged workforce can boost any company’s bottom line. According to Aberdeen Group, having engaged employees increases customer loyalty by 233 percent and revenue by 26 percent annually.

Conversely, if your employees are extrinsically motivated, they more than likely need constant prodding in order to produce. This approach may work for a short time, but it’s unsustainable in the long run. Not every task or project can be rewarded with cash or perks. In addition, if employees’ sole source of motivation is fear-based ­– like fear of displeasing their manager or losing their jobs – they can burn out quickly. In that case, what’s left is a group of disillusioned, disengaged employees who can impact the bottom line, too, but negatively. In fact, Harvard Business Review reports that just one of them can cost a business approximately $12,000 per year.

How to Spark and Build Intrinsic Motivation

Luckily, how employees are motivated isn’t written in the stars. Managers can spark intrinsic motivation in anyone – and in the process, create an engaged employee – by providing members of their team with:

  • Defined roles: Simply put, employees who understand what they are supposed to do tend to be more productive than those who do not. Ensure employees are aware of the responsibilities and duties of their role.
  • Goals: When employees have something to strive toward, they become passionate about tackling the tasks they need to in order to get there. And that feeling of progress is a positive, intrinsic motivator that appeals to almost everyone.
  • Purpose: Employees want to know that what they do matters. For millennials, who are on track to make up the majority of today’s workforce by 2020, this is especially important. Show them how their contribution fits into the bigger picture.

 

For example, if you have video testimonials that cover some of your clients’ biggest success stories, share them. Inspire employees by showing them the difference your organization makes in the everyday lives of the customers you serve.

  • Recognition: Just because employees are intrinsically motivated doesn’t mean they don’t require extrinsic rewards to keep their fire burning. The reason why that doesn’t make them extrinsically motivated is that they’ve already done the job when the reward comes, as opposed to needing the reward to do the job.

Recognition can come in the form of bonuses, awards or even a sincere “thank you.” Showing your appreciation for the good work your engaged employees do goes a long way toward fueling their passion and performance for years to come.

Intrinsic motivation is an important ingredient in the stew of employee engagement, and employee engagement is critical to competitive success. Fortunately, inspiring your workforce to passionate productivity is possible with the right strategy. Try to separate them, it’s an illusion, and you will come to this conclusion.


Brad Richardson

by Brad Richardson


Author Bio: Mr. Richardson joined Paycom in 2005 and has served as its Vice President of Operations since 2009. With more than 25 years’ experience in leadership roles, including managing a $100 million commercial real-estate portfolio at MetLife and two car dealerships, Brad focuses on developing future leaders as well as refining processes in order to support Paycom’s growth. He earned his bachelor’s degree from Southern Methodist University and his MBA from the University of Texas at Dallas. Outside of work, he enjoys playing golf, traveling and spending time with his wife and three children.

reverification

Best Practices for Utilizing Section 3 of the Form I-9

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Best Practices for Utilizing Section 3 of the Form I-9

Employers are used to filling out Section 1 and Section 2 of Form I-9 because it’s required for every employee. However, Section 3 – otherwise known as the reverification process– can be a bit mystifying.

Who should be reverified?

Employees with expiring employment authorization or documentation should be reverified to ensure continued authorization to work in the United States. The need for reverification is determined by looking at the List A and List C documents that were presented when the I-9 was initially completed. The work authorization expiration date entered by the employee in Section 1, if any, also should be taken into consideration.

When should the reverification process be completed?

The reverification process should be completed prior to the expiration date of the employee’s authorization or documentation. The expiration date is found in two places: the date provided by the employee in Section 1, and the date recorded under List A or List C in Section 2. If these dates conflict, employers should use the earlier date to determine when reverification is necessary.

The United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) recommends reminding employees that their documentation will expire at least 90 days ahead of the expiration date. This gives them time to present a List A or List C document or receipt showing continued work authorization. Paycom’s Document and Task Management system helps to ease the burden on employers by providing reminders 90 days prior to an employee’s reverification date.

When should the reverification process NOT be used?

Knowing when you cannot reverify an employee is important, too. U.S. citizens and noncitizen nationals should not be reverified. Additionally, lawful permanent residents should not be reverified if they provide a Form I-551, Permanent Resident or Alien Registration Receipt card for Section 2. An employee’s citizenship status is found in Section 1, as well as at the top of Section 2. Also, List B documents – even if they expire – should not be reverified.

How do you complete Section 3?

To complete Section 3, simply examine the unexpired documents presented by your employee to determine if they appear to be authentic and relate to your employee. Then, record the document title, document number and expiration date, if there is one. Lastly, sign and date this section. You must use Section 3 from the most recent Form I-9, even if the employee’s original form is an older version.  Likewise, if you previously have completed Section 3 for the employee, you should use Section 3 on a new version of the form and attach it to the employee’s original I-9.

 Other instances in which you can use Section 3

Employers also may complete Section 3 when an employee is rehired within three years of the date that the Form I-9 was originally completed. To complete Section 3 for rehires:

  • Confirm that the original I-9 relates to the employee.
  • Determine if the employee is still authorized to work or if reverification is required by reviewing Section.
  • Enter the date of rehire in Section 3 if the employee’s work authorization is still valid.
  • If expired, request the employee’s valid List A or List C document and complete a Section 3 reverification.
  • Sign and date Section 3.

 

Name Changes

You also can use Section 3 to record when your employee has a legal name change. You are not required to update Form I-9 for name changes. However, the USCIS recommends maintaining correct information on an employee’s Form I-9. Similarly, you are not required to request documentation of a name change from an employee, but it is recommended in order to be reasonably assured of your employee’s identity if the government ever asks to audit the Form I-9.

Paycom’s Document and Task Management solution automates employment verification from within the Paycom system to help ensure compliance and reduce your exposure to audits and penalties from Form I-9 violations. Employees and employers can complete the Form I-9 online, including Section 3, utilize electronic signature verification, and securely store completed Form I-9s and supporting documentation within the Paycom system.

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Posted in Blog, Compliance, Document Management, Featured

Alyssa Looney

by Alyssa Looney


Author Bio: As a compliance attorney for Paycom, Alyssa Looney monitors laws, rules and regulations to ensure that the Paycom software is up to date, specifically regarding immigration law and state law developments in the Western United States. She holds a JD and an MBA from Pennsylvania State University, as well as a bachelor’s degree from Texas A&M University. Outside of work, Alyssa enjoys cooking, being active, playing with her puppy and exploring Oklahoma City.

May the 4th

Disturbance in Your Workforce? May the 4th Be With You

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A short time ago in an employee suggestion box not far, far away, this note from a disengaged employee was discovered.

Dear Management,

Being a real trooper, I’ve faithfully served this empire for many parsecs. But lately, morale here is in the trash compactor. I’m close to “storming” out of here! Here’s why:

  • We don’t feel valued. It’s challenging to work for someone who acts like a dictator. (The black cape? A bit much.)
  • We want a comfortable working environment. These uniforms don’t exactly help. (I have to plan bathroom breaks 30 minutes in advance.)
  • We want to contribute, but we’re afraid the boss will choke us from across the room if he doesn’t like what we say. A little two-way constructive feedback could make a death star-sized difference. 
  • I find our lack of training disturbing. With the literal universe at our fingertips, why do we not have an online learning management system?

A disengaged staff is a real phantom menace. Don’t let this happen; awaken your workforce today with our “What Employees Want” toolkit to help you keep the force in your workforce as strong as possible.

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Posted in Blog, Employee Engagement, Featured, HR Management, Learning Management, What Employees Want

Rod Lott

by Rod Lott


Author Bio: As Paycom’s Creative Services Manager, Rod Lott brings more than two decades of experience in marketing, advertising, branding and journalism. A published author and a graduate of the University of Oklahoma, he has worked with such brands as Blue Cross Blue Shield, Sonic Drive-In and OU.

Paid Family Leave Program

New York to Implement Nation’s Most Comprehensive Paid Family Leave Program

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New York to Implement Nation’s Most Comprehensive Paid Family Leave Program

Private employers in the state of New York will soon be required to provide up to 12 weeks of paid family leave. The new law will apply to all employees of employers covered by the state’s worker’s compensation law and will be completely employee-funded via payroll deductions. Public employers are permitted to participate by opting-in to the program.

Growing Trend

These types of “paid family leave” laws continue to gain momentum. Three other states (California, New Jersey and Rhode Island) provide workers with partial pay during parental leave. Some cities have even joined in on the trend. San Francisco passed a paid family leave program in 2016, and Washington, D.C. also recently approved one that will take effect in 2020.

New York lawmakers championed this law as a pivotal step in the pursuit of equality and dignity in both the workplace and home. “New York enacted the strongest paid family leave plan in the nation to ensure that no one has to choose between losing a job and missing the birth of a child, or being able to spend time with a loved one in their final days,” said New York Governor, Andrew Cuomo, upon passage of the law.

Employee Eligibility

The New York legislation originally passed in April of 2016, but the obligations for employers and employees were announced just recently.

Beginning January 1, 2018, the state’s paid family leave program will provide employees with employment protection and partial wage replacement if they spend time away from work to:

  1. bond with a child (including fostering or adopting)
  2. help relieve family pressures when someone is called to active military service
  3. care for a close relative with a serious health condition

A “close relative” as defined under the law includes a spouse, domestic partner, child, parent (including in-law), grandparent and grandchild. An employee must be employed full-time for 26 weeks, or part-time for 175 days to be eligible for a paid family leave benefit. An employer may permit an employee to use vacation or sick leave while on leave, but may not require its use.

 Employer Impact

The complete 12-week benefit will not be implemented fully until 2021. The amount of paid family leave and the percentage of the employee’s salary paid will be realized over four years:

 

Year Weeks
Available
Max % of
Employee Salary
Cap % of State
Average Weekly Wage
1/1/2018 8 50% 50%
1/1/2019 10 55% 55%
1/1/2020 10 60% 60%
1/1/2021 12 67% 67%

 

Employers will be required to purchase a paid family leave insurance policy or self-insure. The employee will pay the premiums of the policy via payroll deductions, beginning July 1, 2017.

For more information about the phase-in process, calculation of the Average Weekly Wage, or general information on the program, visit the New York paid family leave website.

Disclaimer: This blog includes general information about legal issues and developments in the law. Such materials are for informational purposes only and may not reflect the most current legal developments. These informational materials are not intended, and must not be taken, as legal advice on any particular set of facts or circumstances. You need to contact a lawyer licensed in your jurisdiction for advice on specific legal issues problems.

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Posted in Blog, Employment Law, Featured, Pre-Employment, Talent Acquisition, Talent Management

Jason Hines

by Jason Hines


Author Bio: Jason Hines is a Paycom compliance attorney. With more than five years’ experience in the legal field, he monitors developments in human resource laws, rules and regulations to ensure any changes are promptly updated in Paycom’s system for our clients. Previously, he was an attorney at the Oklahoma City law firm Elias, Books, Brown & Nelson. Hines earned a bachelor’s degree from the University of Central Oklahoma and his juris doctor degree from the Oklahoma City University School of Law, where he graduated cum laude. A fan of the Oklahoma City Thunder, Hines also enjoys exploring the great outdoors with his wife and daughter.

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