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3 common Misconceptions of Performance Reviews

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Some say performance reviews are a thing of the past; a waste of time for everyone involved. If you’re part of these naysayers then most likely you haven’t been part of a culture that embraces the year-round significance of performance reviews.

Performance reviews are essential to workplace management yet often times they hold lower weight amidst a sea of projects, to-do lists, meetings and more. Supervisors tend to look at performance reviews through jaded lenses, but what they may be overlooking is the fact that effective performance management leads to improved productivity. According to a survey by Towers Perrin, of 203 top executives across all industries, organizations in which employees were measurement-managed were identified as being in the top one-third of their industry. The findings indicated that employee performance reviews are the most important measurement tool separating a highly productive firm from the rest of the market.

Three Common Misconceptions

Performance reviews are more than rankings on paper; in fact, today they have evolved into a highly engaging tool for managers and employees alike. However, there are still a few misconceptions regarding performance reviews that need to be addressed:

  1. Performance reviews are a benefit for managers only

Transparency is appreciated in the workforce today. Employees have more responsibility and are encouraged to express their concerns and ideas. One unique way to encourage involvement from all levels in your organization is through 360 degree reviews. This opens the door for two-way communication between employees and management. Organizational leaders can offer feedback to employees and vice versa. 360 degree reviews are in conjunction with performance reviews and offer an additional way to improve workforce efficiency, productivity and engagement.

You can make this even more beneficial by having your employees self-assess. This allows your employees and managers to see exactly where your employees see themselves. The information gathered empowers both parties and opens up yet another line of dialogue between the employee and manager.

  1. Feedback should only happen annually

Whoever decided feedback was only necessary during annual performance reviews doesn’t understand the proper ways in which to communicate in the workplace. In order to be effective, feedback should be given on a regular basis. Feedback not only gives recognition to employees for their efforts, but it keeps them engaged and accountable. A great way to open the lines of communication can be done through monthly or weekly one-on-ones.

  1. Goals should be set and then left alone

Just as business initiatives have to be adaptable so too should departmental and personal goals. Goals should constantly be re-assessed and more than just at the beginning of the year or even every quarter. It is important to keep goals in line with current priorities within your organization. Try utilizing development and professional goals with each employee. Take this into consideration when beginning the performance review process. What were the goals? How have they changed? Do they accurately reflect current market conditions as they stand today?

If you recognize the faults as stated above, then you are on track for a successful performance review. In order for performance reviews to add value, managers must offer a chance for self-assessment, meet communication expectations and readdress goals on a consistent basis. If these are met, then performance reviews can result in improved efficiency, productivity and employee morale.

 

 



Author Bio: As a Human Resource Professional with over 20 years of experience, Jenny has extensive experience in management, mentoring, policy development and recruiting. Jenny's team player mentality and leadership abilities make her an elite HR Director who is always on top of the latest HR trends. She relentlessly directs associates and executives to achieve their maximum potential for both themselves and their companies.

Employee Self-Service Software

Missing out on Key Functions of Your Employee Self-Service Software?

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Missing out on Key Functions of Your Employee Self-Service Software?

If you’re like most company leaders, you’re probably making use of employee self-service software to a certain extent. In fact, in a joint study by Paycom and HR.com, 88.5 percent of companies surveyed used self-service tools. And about 87 percent of these organizations considered self-service software to be the most efficient way to provide employees with payroll and HR information.

You can discover more of the results of this survey in our whitepaper, The Role of Self-Service Software: Get the Most out of a Crucial Technology.

However, we also found that a large number of the organizations surveyed aren’t getting as much out of their self-service software as they potentially could. They are leaving functionality on the table and missing out on the opportunity to streamline their training, ensure that forms are efficiently completed and securely stored, and improve the accuracy of information entered by their employees.

Streamlined Employee Training

Companies that use their employee self-service software as a platform for training are able to reach a large number of employees with one streamlined training effort, rather than scheduling several training meetings to accommodate staff schedules, wasting time and losing productivity.

Incorporating training videos and slideshows into existing employee self-service software allows your employees to complete trainings when their schedules allow.

In our research, companies are using self-service technology to serve many functions (some of the most common include accessing payroll information and enrolling in benefits). Unfortunately, only 39 percent of companies we surveyed that are already utilizing self-service software are taking advantage of employee training opportunities through that software. Most organizations are missing out on this opportunity.

Secure, Efficiently Completed Forms

The forms that your employees are already filling out can be integrated with an existing self-service software to make it easier for them to complete and ensure that you can store the forms securely and efficiently. We found that this is another area where many organizations have room for improvement.

Of the organizations we surveyed that used self-service software, HR entered 50 percent or less of employee information in only 40 percent of those organizations. In 29 percent of surveyed companies with self-service software, HR was still entering 90 percent or more employee data.

Having a way for your employees to fill out performance reviews, feedback surveys and other forms within employee self-service software allows them to complete the forms on their own time, allowing your HR department to focus on more mission-critical projects. It can also cut down on paper storage and allow anyone who needs access to the completed forms to find them in one secure location online.

Accurate Employee Information

One surprising finding from our study was that while 87 percent of respondents said that employee self-service software was helpful, HR still enters in over 50 percent of employee data for 60 percent of surveyed companies using self-service software. The most common barrier that kept organizations from having a majority of information entered by their employees (instead of their HR department) was a concern over the accuracy of employee-entered data.

That’s a valid concern, but from our research, employee-entered data has the opportunity to improve information accuracy. Over 80 percent of organizations we surveyed determined that employee-entered data helps hold employees accountable for the accuracy of the data—and 51 percent agreed that employee accountability for that accuracy reduces compliance risk.

In addition to a reduced compliance risk, having employees enter their own information can free up your HR department to do more strategic work. In fact, improving your company’s usage of employee self-service software can help your HR department save up to 10 hours per week!

Learn how other companies of all sizes are making use of their employee self-service software and what can be gained from these and other underutilized capabilities in our whitepaper, The Role of Self-Service Software: Get the Most out of a Crucial Technology.

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Posted in Blog, Document Management, Featured, HR Management, Learning Management, Payroll

Lauren Rogers

by Lauren Rogers


Author Bio: As a communications specialist at Paycom, Lauren Rogers keeps employees abreast of company news and events, and provides insight to industry leaders regarding issues affecting human capital management. With experience in marketing and communications, Lauren has written blogs and other materials for a variety of businesses and nonprofits. Outside the office, she enjoys gardening, testing new recipes and sipping something caffeinated with her nose in a book.

Changing Drug Screening Policies

4 Insights About Evolving Drug Screening Policies

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4 Insights About Evolving Drug Screening Policies

During the November 2016 election, eight of the nine states with marijuana-related decisions on the ballot voted to legalize the drug for medical and/or recreational purposes. This trend has gained traction across the country; today, more than half the nation has state laws in place that allow marijuana for medicinal use.

Marijuana legalization has created tension between state laws, federal law and organizational best practices nationwide, causing employers from numerous industries to revisit their current drug-screening policies to ensure they are best serving their people and the company. To learn more about how organizations could handle this shift in state policy, Paycom invited Sheehan Phinney attorney Jim Reidy to the HR Break Room podcast.

Listen to expert and attorney Jim Reidy from Sheehan Phinney discuss current and future drug laws on the HR Break Room podcast episode, “A New Leaf on Drug Policy Screening Policies: Time for a Change?”

Specific plans of action may be difficult to determine, but Reidy provided valuable insight and four major takeaways about quickly changing drug screening-policies.

1. Ask the Big Questions Now

Employers should consider asking a few key, ever-evolving questions about their current drug-screening policies right now.

Reidy suggests asking:

  • What do your drug and alcohol policies actually say?
  • Are you even asking about medications in the workplace? If so, why?
  • Are you asking about the current use of illicit or illegal drugs?
  • For nationwide companies, how do you draft policy in states where marijuana is either medically or recreationally legal? Do you default to federal law or try to accommodate employees and prospective candidates in those positions?

Hard answers may not exist on how to accommodate every employer and employee concern, but asking these questions now will help prepare you for issues that could arise as state laws continue to evolve. If marijuana legislation begins to affect your state, you will be more familiar with the possible pressure points that may influence your policies.

 2. Know Risks and Current State Laws

During the HR Break Room podcast, Reidy cited risk management as one of the most important aspects of changing state laws.

“HR professionals generally work in risk management, and one issue with risk management is safety and productivity, “Reidy said. “Twenty-six states now have medical marijuana approved, and eight states and the District of Columbia have recreational marijuana approved, and those numbers will likely increase in the next year or two. Employers are concerned about what impact it’s going to have on everything from attendance to mental acuity, productivity and largely safety.”

Take time to educate yourself on exactly what your state laws require before choosing a strategy. The better you understand your state’s legislation, the easier it will be to determine how it may impact your organization.

3. Communicating with Managers and Supervisors

According to Reidy, one of the most important things HR can do to prepare for changes is to learn about employee concerns by communicating and working closely with your managers.

“Assuming that they’ve tailored their policy appropriately to their workplace, to their locations, to their standards, their mission and the like, then I would spend a fair amount of time on training my supervisors and managers on the new policy,” he said. “Managers, I like to say, are your eyes and ears, but they’re also your Achilles’ heel. Be very careful with your managers … once managers have been trained, have them share policy changes and train them effectively to ensure they know what it means.”

Once your organization has created these clear channels of communication between HR, managers and employees, it will be easier to create a strategy for implementing a new policy if changes occur on a state or federal level.

4. No Universal Answer

Perhaps the biggest takeaway from our talk with Reidy was that there is no universal answer for all organizations, which is why employers must learn what works best for their business.

Reidy said it best, “employers, know your workplace, know your locations and know the state law that might apply. Be aware that the state law is certainly going to be different than the federal law, and have a realistic approach to screening and testing, and being consistent about your enforcement of your policy going forward.”

Learn more by subscribing to HR Break Room and listen to our podcast, A New Leaf in Drug Screening Policies: Is it Time for a Change?

 

Disclaimer: This blog includes general information about legal issues and developments in the law. Such materials are for informational purposes only and may not reflect the most current legal developments. These informational materials are not intended, and must not be taken, as legal advice on any particular set of facts or circumstances. You need to contact a lawyer licensed in your jurisdiction for advice on specific legal problems.

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Posted in Blog, Compliance, Employment Law, Featured

Caleb Masters

by Caleb Masters


Author Bio: Caleb is the host of The HR Break Room and a Webinar and Podcast Producer at Paycom. With more than 5 years of experience as a published online writer and content producer, Caleb has produced dozens of podcasts and videos for multiple industries both local and online. Caleb continues to assist organizations creatively communicate their ideas and messages through researched talks, blog posts and new media. Outside of work, Caleb enjoys running, discussing movies and trying new local restaurants.

Vacation

3 Ways an Employee’s Vacation Improves the Bottom Line

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3 Ways an Employee’s Vacation Improves the Bottom Line 

Temperatures are rising, days are longer and blockbuster movies are being released faster and more furiously. It must be summer – a season when most employees take time off to relax and unwind. In fact, approximately 46 percent of all travel occurs in July, the heart of summertime. If you’re worried productivity might take a nosedive (into the swimming pool) over the next few months, don’t sweat it. You might be surprised to learn these statistics and benefits of enjoying time outside of the office.

  1. Increased Productivity

Everyone deserves a break every now and then, right? And the good news is, most employers agree. According to recent research, 91 percent of full-time employees are given vacation time in their employment package. Yet, surprisingly, only 23 percent use their full paid time off (PTO), even though four out of five would choose benefits as vacation time over a pay raise. Why? According to a recent Forbes article, a fear of getting behind and the concern that others can’t do their work are leading factors to remaining on the clock and off the beach.

One of the best ways you can increase productivity is by fostering a culture with a healthy work-life integration. That means taking time out of the office to enjoy the big (and little) things in life, from the Caribbean cruise of your dreams to watching your daughter’s dance rehearsal. According to research, employees who use their allotted PTO are 31 percent more productive over the course of a year than those who don’t. In fact, for every 10 hours of vacation time, there’s an 8 percent boost in performance review scores. And the higher the score, the better the quality of work.

  1. Improved Retention Rate

 Imagine your organization is like a ship, and your employees are the propeller, launching your company forward. In other words, employees either can make or break your company’s success; therefore, attracting and retaining world-class talent should be at the top of your priorities. And if vacation time is one of the biggest benefits employees seek in an employer, it’s a no-brainer that this employee motivation can affect the retention rate.

In recent reports, 23 percent of employees indicated they would be motivated to change jobs for more vacation days. That’s almost a quarter of the workforce! This is a problem because not only does turnover send the office morale plummeting, but increased turnover also creates added expenses in training new personnel, not to mention the time and money needed to get new hires up to speed. In light of this alarming statistic, ensure you are providing and allowing enough PTO to your employees. Otherwise, they could abandon ship altogether.

  1. Heightened Employee Engagement

 According to Forbes, employee engagement is defined as “the emotional commitment the employee has to the organization and its goals.” Chances are, if your employees are actively engaged with your company – meaning, they are invested in its successes and challenges – they are more likely to tackle more demanding projects, without being asked.

So how does a little extra PTO affect employee engagement? According to research from Quantum Workplace, employees who’ve taken time off in the last 30 days are approximately 16 percent more likely to be engaged than those who haven’t taken a vacation in the past 12 months. In that same study, 72 percent of employees who took off five or more consecutive days within the last month were more engaged, compared to 57 percent of employees who took a break over a year ago. With results like these, it’s easy to see why it’s essential to reset and recharge. Do yourself – and your employees, a favor this summer: encourage your workforce to take a well-deserved break.

To learn more about the benefits of paid time off and how it positively impacts your company, download our new “Sun, Sand and PTO Statistics: Vacationing by the Numbers” infographic.

 

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Posted in Blog, Featured, Talent Management, What Employees Want

Monica Johnson

by Monica Johnson


Author Bio: As Paycom’s client marketing specialist, Monica Johnson utilizes a mixture of marketing and human capital management knowledge gained from years of industry experience. A graduate from the University of Central Oklahoma, Johnson has been with Paycom since 2013 and has served in numerous roles during her career with the company. In her spare time, she enjoys baking, exploring Oklahoma City and sipping coffee, while reading a good book, at one of her favorite local shops.

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